been trying hard not to get into trouble, but I've got a war in my mind

D I S T R I C T T W E L V E

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AVATAR
{ WATERBENDER }

 

jenniferjamboree:

my history professor told me today that he “likes the way I look vaguely pissed off” during class

earthly-pleasures:

myhellhoundisbiggerthanyours:

satanstruemistress:

grimmzai:

un-original-fan:

peppermint3y3candy:

oh hell no

fucking nope.

FUCK THAT.

I think this movie traumatized a generation.

I fucking loved that movie and I always wanted to play the game because I was so sure I would slay everyone

There are two kinds of people

earthly-pleasures:

myhellhoundisbiggerthanyours:

satanstruemistress:

grimmzai:

un-original-fan:

peppermint3y3candy:

oh hell no

fucking nope.

FUCK THAT.

I think this movie traumatized a generation.

I fucking loved that movie and I always wanted to play the game because I was so sure I would slay everyone

There are two kinds of people

(Source: cartoon-motion-life)

riseofthefallenone:

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together

Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency. It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use. This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.TL;DR: It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

how romantic

riseofthefallenone:

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together


Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.

The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency.

It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use.

This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.

TL;DR:
It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

how romantic

(Source: smilewill-killyou)

gayconcertdude:

Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks, taken by me in Vancouver.  The lighting at this show was so fucking beautiful and intense that I left these shots as is.  Ours was the first show on their 2014 ‘Long Time Gone Tour’.

Oberyn Nymeros Martell, Tyrion muttered under his breath as he fell in beside the man. The Red Viper of Dorne. And what in the seven hells am I supposed to do with him? He knew the man only by reputation, to be sure… but the reputation was fearsome. When he was no more than sixteen, Prince Oberyn had been found abed with the paramour of old Lord Yronwood, a huge man of fierce repute and short temper. A duel ensued, though in view of the prince’s youth and high birth, it was only to first blood. Both men took cuts, and honor was satisfied. Yet Prince Oberyn soon recovered, while Lord Yronwood’s wounds festered and killed him. Afterward men whispered that Oberyn had fought with a poisoned sword, and ever thereafter friends and foes alike called him the Red Viper. 

(Source: oberynymeros)